We have filed briefs opposing over a dozen challenges to the coverage requirement brought by religious non-profit organizations.

Non-profit organizations challenged the religious accommodation that allows religious entities to refuse to provide their students and employees with insurance coverage for contraception. Under the accommodation, an entity need only state its objection in writing, and the government will arrange for a third-party to pay for and provide the coverage instead. Remarkably, many entities have challenged this accommodation in court—insisting that the mere act of requesting it violates their religious freedom. 

Leading up to Zubik v. Price, nearly every Court of Appeals to consider the question rejected the non-profit organizations’ argument and upheld the accommodation. In Zubik, however, the Supreme Court sent these cases back to the Courts of Appeals to consider additional accommodations. In January 2017, after requesting information from the public, the Obama administration concluded that there was no feasible alternative. Unfortunately, no resolution has been reached and these women’s access to contraception remains in limbo. 

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In May 2017, President Trump signed a "religious freedom" executive order  aimed in part at attacking women’s access to birth control. The executive order started the process to roll back the Affordable Care Act’s contraception coverage rule. In October 2017, the Trump administration issued regulations that created a sweeping religious exemption—any corporation or university can use religion to deny their employees and students coverage for birth control. 

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In October 2017, Americans United and the National Women’s Law Center filed Shiraef v. Hargan, a lawsuit challenging the Trump administration’s contraception coverage rules. We represented women at risk of being denied birth control coverage, including University of Notre Dame students. Barely a week after we filed the case, Notre Dame reversed course on its plan to take advantage of the Trump administration rules, announcing instead that employees and students would continue to have contraceptive coverage. Because these women were promised access to birth control at the time, they decided they didn’t need to continue their lawsuit.

Then, in February 2018, Notre Dame reversed course again after signing an illegal settlement agreement with the Trump Administration. Notre Dame announced that it would stop covering certain forms of contraception for 17,000 students, employees, and their families. The Trump Administration and university bargained away these women’s rights, but we’re not going to let them get away with it.

On June 26, 2018, Americans United, the National Women’s Law Center, the Center for Reproductive Rights, and Macey Swanson LLP, challenged the illegal settlement on behalf of a group of Notre Dame students. These students aren’t afraid to fight back and say that denying women access to contraception in the name of religion is discrimination, plain and simple.

Countless other women will also be harmed by the new rules. That’s why eight states and our allies including the ACLU are also in court challenging the rule. Federal judges in Pennsylvania and California have blocked the birth control rules.

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AU continues to fight the regulations outside of court. In December 2017, we filed public comments to tell the Trump Administration that these new rules were unfair, unconstitutional, and harmful. And we joined our allies to deliver over 500,000 comments from people across the country—including Americans United supporters—who also think that attacking women’s access to healthcare is wrong.

We will continue to fight to make sure all women have affordable, seamless access to contraception. Women’s health and equality and religious freedom are at stake.  




Catholic Health Care System v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting the religious organizations’ claims
(August 7, 2015)

Our brief to the Court of Appeals (June 3, 2014)


East Baptist Texas University v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Fifth Circuit)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting the religious organizations’ claims (June 22, 2015)

Our brief to the Court of Appeals (September 23, 2014)


Geneva College v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Third Circuit)

The interim order from the U.S. Supreme Court (June 29, 2015)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting the religious organizations’ claims (February 11, 2015)

Our brief to the Court of Appeals (June 17, 2014)


Little Sisters of the Poor v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting Little Sisters of the Poor’s claims
(July 14, 2015)

Our brief to the Court of Appeals (April 3, 2014)

The interim order from the U.S. Supreme Court (January 24, 2014)


Michigan Catholic Conference v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting the religious organizations’ claims (June 11, 2014)

Our brief to the Court of Appeals (February 27, 2014)



Wheaton College v. Price (U.S. Court of Appeals for the Seventh Circuit)

The decision from the Court of Appeals rejecting Wheaton College’s claims (July 1, 2015)

The interim order from U.S. Supreme Court (July 3, 2014)